Andrew L. McCann

Associate Professor of English

Studying literature as an undergraduate taught me to think outside of prevailing social and economic logics. It was a tremendously exciting undertaking. Whether I’m teaching Romanticism or contemporary experimental fiction, one of my goals is to reproduce the inherently critical impulse that I believe lies at the heart of literary expression.

216 Sanborn
HB 6032
Department:
English
Education:
B.A. University of Melbourne
M.A. University of Melbourne
M.A. Cornell University
Ph.D. Cornell University

Selected Publications

Marcus Clarke’s Bohemia: Literature and Modernity in Colonial Melbourne (Melbourne: University of Melbourne Press, 2004).

Cultural Politics in the 1790s: Literature, Radicalism and the Public Sphere (London: Macmillan Press, 1999).

Subtopia (Melbourne: Vulgar Press, 2005). Turkish Translation (Istanbul: Versus Kitap, 2006).

The White Body of Evening (Sydney: HarperCollins Australia, 2002, 2003). Japanese Translation (Tokyo: Kokushokankokai, 2009).

“Ruins, Refuse and the Politics of Allegory in The Old Curiosity Shop,” Nineteenth-Century Literature vol. 66, no. 2 (September 2011), 179-194.

"Discrepant Cosmopolitanism and Contemporary Fiction: Reading the Inhuman in Christos Tsiolkas’s Dead Europe and Roberto Bolaño’s 2666,Antipodes vol. 24, no. 2 (December 2010): 135-141.

“Henry Kendall’s Twofold Life: Sin, Shame and the Experience of Colonial Poetry,” Australian Literary Studies vol. 25, no. 3 (October 2010): 20-34.

“Christos Tsiolkas and the Pornographic Logic of Commodity Capitalism,” Australian Literary Studies vol. 25, no. 1 (May 2010): 31-41.

“Autochthony and Extinction in the Settler Colony: Henry Kendall's ‘Aboriginal Man’,” in David Carter  and Wang Guanglin eds. Modern Australian Criticism and Theory (Qingdao: China Ocean University Press, 2010): 50-60.

“The Eventfulness of Roberto Bolaño,” Overland 199 (Winter 2010): 74-79.

“Militancy and Melancholia,” Overland 192 (Spring 2008): 34-36.

“Professing the Popular: Political Fiction circa 2006,” Australian Literary Studies vol. 32, no. 2 (2007): 43-57.

“Colonial Nature-Inscription: on Haunted Landscapes,” in Helen Tiffin ed. Five Emus to the King of Siam: Environment and Empire (Rodopi: Amsterdam and New York, 2007): 71-83.

“Rosa Praed and the Vampire Aesthete,” Victorian Literature and Culture 35 (2007): 175-187.

“The International of Excreta: World Literature and its Other,” Overland 186 (Autumn 2007): 20-24.

“The Literature of Extinction,” Meanjin 65.1 (March 2006): 48-54.

“The Obstinacy of the Sacred,” Antipodes vol. 17, no.2 (December 2005): 152-158.

“Unknown Australia: Rosa Praed’s Vanished Race,” Australian Literary Studies vol. 22, no. 1 (2005): 37-50.

“The Savage Metropolis: Animism, Aesthetics and the Pleasures of a Vanished Race,” Textual Practice 17:2 (2003): 317-333. Republished in Short Story Criticism vol. 94 (New York: Thomson and Gale, 2007): 28-36.

“Textual Phantasmagoria: Marcus Clarke, Light Literature and the Colonial Uncanny,” Australian Literary Studies vol. 21, no. 2 (October 2003): 138-150. Republished in Short Story Criticism vol. 94 (New York: Thomson and Gale, 2007): 20-28.

“Bohemia and the Dream-Life of the Colonial City,” Journal of the Association for the Study of Australian Literature vol. 1 (2002): 4-18.

“Romanticism, Nationalism and the Mythology of the Popular in William Lane’s The Workingman’s Paradise,” Journal of Australian Studies 70 (2001): 1-12.

“Humanism After Auschwitz: Reflections on Jean Améry’s Freitod,” Angelaki vol. 6, no. 3. (December 2001): 71-81.

“Romantic Self-Fashioning: John Thelwall and the Science of Elocution,” Studies in Romanticism vol. 40, no. 2 (Summer 2001): 215-232.

“Romantic Nationalism and the Descent into Myth: William Lane’s The Workingman’s Paradise,” in Philip Mead (ed.), Australian Literary Studies in the 21st Century (Hobart: Association for the Study of Australian Literature, 2001): 181-188.

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Works in Progress

The Differentia of Literature: Networks of Alterity in Victorian Popular Fiction.

Christos Tsiolkas and the Literature of Annihilation: Politics, Obscenity, Celebrity.