Christian P. Haines

Assistant Professor of English

Christian P. Haines is Assistant Professor of English at Dartmouth College. He's recently finished a book, A Desire Called America: Biopolitics, Utopia, and the Literary Commons, which will be published by Fordham University Press. He also co-edited and introduced a special issue of Cultural Critique, "What Comes After the Subject?" (Spring 2017). Essays by him have appeared in journals including Criticism, Genre, Cultural Critique, and boundary 2. He has work forthcoming in Arizona Quarterly and Postmodern Culture and in edited collections including The Routledge Companion to Literature and Economics (Routledge), The Next Generation: Emerging Voices in Utopian Studies (Peter Lang), and Neoliberalism and American Literature (UNH Press). He serves as a contributing editor for Angelaki: Journal of the Theoretical Humanities. He is researching a second book, The Scored Life, which investigates how contemporary social subjects live and die by financial abstractions. With Bethany Moreton, he co-organizes the Critical Finance Studies Research Program at Dartmouth: https://leslie.dartmouth.edu/opportunities/faculty/research-programs. You can find additional information about the group and its events at https://www.facebook.com/groups/802755026494777/?ref=br_tf.

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006 Sanborn House
HB 6032
Department:
English
Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies
Education:
PhD, University of Minnesota
BA, University of Florida

Selected Publications

"On Lyric Poetry and Financialization.” The Routledge Companion to Literature and Economics. Eds. Michelle Chihara and Matt Seybold. Routledge Press (Forthcoming, Fall 2018).

“Notes for a Natural History of the State of Exception, or, Exhaustion and Endurance in Russell Banks’s Continental Drift ” (Forthcoming, 2017). Arizona Quarterly, Special Issue: “Biopolitics and American Literature.” Word Count: 13,392.

“The Impersonal is Political: Adrienne Rich’s The Dream of a Common Language, Feminism, and the Art of Biopolitics.” Cultural Critique 96. Special Issue: “What Comes After the Subject?” (Spring 2017).

“Life After the Subject” (with Sean Grattan). Introduction to Cultural Critique 96. Special Issue: “What Comes After the Subject?” (Spring 2017).

“A Lyric Intensity of Thought: On the Potentiality and Limits of Giorgio Agamben’s 'Homo Sacer' Project.” Boundary 2 Online. August 29, 2016. Word Count: 14,869. https://www.boundary2.org/2016/08/christian-haines-a-lyric-intensity-of-thought-on-the-potentiality-and-limits-of-giorgio-agambens-homo-sacer-project/

“Paradise Actually Exists: Biopolitics and Utopian Praxis in William S. Burroughs’sThe Place of Dead Roads.” Genre 47.2 (Summer 2014): 175-202

“The Scored Life: Financialization in Gary Shteyngart’s Super Sad True Love Story.” The Third Rail 3 (Fall 2014): 44-47. http://thirdrailquarterly.org/wp-content/uploads/C_Haines_Scored-Life.pdf

“Life’s Entanglements with Writing: A Review of Christopher Breu’s Insistence of the Material: Literature in the Age of Biopolitics and Arne de Boever’s Narrative Care: Biopolitics and the Novel.” Textual Practice 29.5 (June 2015): 1017-1026.

“Oscillations prolétaires: Poésie du travail, travail de la poésie chez Arthur Rimbaud et Walt Whitman [Proletarian Oscillations: the Poetry of Labor, the Labor of Poetry in Arthur Rimbaud and Walt Whitman].” Parade Sauvage: Revue d’études rimbaldiennes 23 (Fall 2012): 65-101.

“Life in Crisis: The Biopolitical Ambivalence of Joseph Conrad’s The Secret Agent.” Criticism 54.1 (Winter 2012): 85-115.

“Corporeal Time: The Cinematic Bodies of Arthur Rimbaud and Gilles Deleuze.” Angelaki: A Journal of the Theoretical Humanities 16.2 (Winter 2011): 103-26.

“Specters of the Dialectic: A Review of Fredric Jameson’s Valences of the Dialectic.” Cultural Critique 77 (Winter 2011): 241-247.

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Speaking Engagements

Participation in and co-organizing of the roundtable “Is There a Place for the Commons?” American Studies Association Annual Meeting, Denver, Novermber 19, 2016.

"What Impossible Future Haunts the Present: On Biopolitics, Utopia, and Walt Whitman’s Afterlife.” Futures of American Studies Institute, Hanover, June 23, 2016.

“Martin Delany, or Para-Ontologies of Blackness,” C19: The Conference of Nineteenth-Century Americanists, State College, March 20, 2016.

“The Scored Life, or, Global Finance and the Politics of Abstraction,” The Center for Global Studies at Pennsylvania State University, State College, December 10, 2015.

“Emily Dickinson’s Wives: On Biopolitics, American Exceptionalism, and Utopia,” Department of English, University of Massachusetts, Boston, November 10, 2015.

"Walt Whitman's Afterlives: Biopolitics, Living Labor, and the Utopian Impulse (1855-2014)," American Communities Program: “Biopolitical Afterlives,” California State University, Los Angeles, October 31, 2014. Plenary.

Works in Progress

A Desire Called America: Biopolitics, Utopia, and the Literary Commons. (Fordham University Press, Forthcoming)

"Earth, Life, Plasticity: Biopolitics, the Anthropocene, and the Problem of Form.” Biotheory. Ed. Jeffrey Di Leo. Anthem Press, Series: “Symploke Studies in Theory” (Forthcoming, 2019). Word Count: 9,971.

“The Body Utopian, or, Life and Literature at the Intersection of Biopolitics and Utopian Studies.” The Next Generation: Emerging Voices in Utopian Studies. Ed. Phillip Wegner. Peter Lang (Forthcoming, 2019). Word Count: 12,904.

“Eaten Alive, or, Why the Death of Theory is Not Antitheory.” Antitheory. Ed. Jeffrey Di Leo. Bloomsbury Press (Forthcoming, 2019). Word Count: 8,086.

“Fictions of Human Capital, or, Redemption in Neoliberal Times.” Neoliberalism and American Literature. Eds. Stephen Shapiro and Liam Kennedy. University Press of New England (Forthcoming, 2018). Word Count: 9,782.

Selected Works and Activities

Contributing Editor, Angelaki: A Journal of the Theoretical Humanities, Spring 2012-present.